Tuesday, September 14, 2021

Dr Fogel's Latest Video Addresses Key Covid-19 Topics


In a new video, Richard Fogel, MD, FACC, FHRS, Senior Vice President and Chief Clinical Officer, Clinical & Network Services, Ascension, provides the latest information on four topics related to COVID-19:

  • The state of the pandemic.

  • Breakthrough infections.

  • Vaccine effectiveness and booster doses.

  • Alternative treatments.

All Ascension associates will need to be vaccinated against COVID-19 by Nov. 12 for the safety of patients and visitors, associates, families and loved ones, and the community.

Recognizing that there may be instances when an associate may seek a medical or religious accommodation to a vaccination requirement, an exemption process is in place. Exemption applications are due by October 1 to allow time for review. Learn more in our Frequently Asked Questions.

Thursday, September 9, 2021

Legacy CSM (WIMIL) Library Intranet Pages to Retire on September 30, 2021: Use the NEW AW Library Intranet Instead


NOTICE: The old CSM (WIMIL) Library intranet ages will be retired on September 30, 2021.  

     >  Use the Ascension Wisconsin Library Services LibGuide as the NEW AW Library Intranet  Home Page.


Why the change?
  • It has been increasingly difficult, even impossible to maintain 4 separate Library intranets across Ascension Wisconsin (AW) with limited staff.
  • Since the merger of Ascension Wisconsin in 2016, we’ve been working diligently behind the scenes to make sure we offer the SAME library resources throughout the state.   Over the last few years, we’ve  been making changes “under the hood” to codify, unify, and standardize Library offerings.  You may already be using some of our new AW Library Services LibGuide pages.  This will be the new standard going forward.
  • This move is congruent with the idea of One Ascension Wisconsin with one Library Services Department serving the whole of Ascension Wisconsin. 
  •  Rest assured : You’ll still be able to access your favorite Library resources such as Nursing Reference Center, Clinical Key, Access Medicine, LibGuides, ebooks, your favorite eJournals, and more …
  • Your Librarians, Michele Matucheski and Kellee Selden, will still be available to support the work you do by providing articles, and full-text access, research, and training—as usual.
  • The physical libraries at Mercy Medical Center in Oshkosh and the CSM Library in Milwaukee remain the resource libraries for ALL of Ascension Wisconsin.  The Libraries at St Joseph's and All Saints remain open for self service, though Kellee is there on a limited schedule, as posted.  Only the Library intranet website is changing. 

What to use instead?
·          Use the Ascension Wisconsin Library Services LibGuide as the Library Intranet  Home Page: 

·         




How to get there?
·      
        Direct Link :  https://ascension-wi.libguides.com/libraryservices 

          Handy Tip :  Bookmark this page for easy future reference!

After September 30, 2021: the previous paths on the legacy intranets will also lead you to the new AW Library LibGuide.


Questions or comments?  Please contact your AW Librarians:
 Michele Matucheski. and Kellee Selden

Legacy MHC Library Without Walls (Fox Valley / WIAPP) Intranet Pages to Retire on October 21, 2021: Use the NEW AW Library Intranet Instead


NOTICE: The old Ministry Health Care (Fox Valley / WIAPP) Library Without Walls intranet pages will be retired on October 21, 2021.    

     >  Use the Ascension Wisconsin Library Services LibGuide as the NEW AW Library Intranet  Home Page.


Why the change?
  • It has been increasingly difficult, even impossible to maintain 4 separate Library intranets across Ascension Wisconsin (AW) with limited staff.
  • Since the merger of Ascension Wisconsin in 2016, we’ve been working diligently behind the scenes to make sure we offer the SAME library resources throughout the state.   Over the last few years, we’ve  been making changes “under the hood” to codify, unify, and standardize Library offerings.  You may already be using some of our new AW Library Services LibGuide pages.  This will be the new standard going forward.
  • This move is congruent with the idea of One Ascension Wisconsin with one Library Services Department to serve the whole of Ascension Wisconsin. 
  •  Rest assured : You’ll still be able to access your favorite Library resources such as Nursing Reference Center, Clinical Key, Access Medicine, LibGuides, ebooks, your favorite eJournals, and more …
  • Your Librarians, Michele Matucheski and Kellee Selden, will still be available to support the work you do by providing articles, and full-text access, research, and training—as usual.
  • The physical libraries at Mercy Medical Center in Oshkosh and the CSM Library in Milwaukee remain the resource libraries for ALL of Ascension Wisconsin.  The Libraries at St Joseph's and All Saints remain open for self service, though Kellee is there on a limited schedule, as posted.  Only the Library intranet website is changing. 

What to use instead?
·          Use the Ascension Wisconsin Library Services LibGuide as the Library Intranet  Home Page: 

·         


How to get there?
·      
        Direct Link :  https://ascension-wi.libguides.com/libraryservices 

          Handy Tip :  Bookmark this page for easy future reference!

After October 21, 2021, the previous paths on the legacy Source intranet will also lead you to the new AW Library LibGuide.


Questions or comments?  Please contact your AW Librarians:
 Michele Matucheski. and Kellee Selden

Wednesday, September 8, 2021

Legacy WFHC (WIGLE) Library Intranet Pages to Retire on September 21, 2021: Use the NEW AW Library Intranet Instead


NOTICE: The old WFHC (WIGLE) Library Intranet Pages will be retired on September 21, 2021.  

     >  Use the Ascension Wisconsin Library Services LibGuide as the NEW AW Library Intranet  Home Page.


Why the change?
  • It has been increasingly difficult, even impossible to maintain 4 separate Library intranets across Ascension Wisconsin (AW) with limited staff.
  • Since the merger of Ascension Wisconsin in 2016, we’ve been working diligently behind the scenes to make sure we offer the SAME library resources throughout the state.   Over the last few years, we’ve  been making changes “under the hood” to codify, unify, and standardize Library offerings.  You may already be using some of our new AW Library Services LibGuide pages.  This will be the new standard going forward.
  • This move is congruent with the idea of One Ascension Wisconsin with one Library Services Department to serve the whole of Ascension Wisconsin. 
  •  Rest assured : You’ll still be able to access your favorite Library resources such as Nursing Reference Center, Clinical Key, Access Medicine, LibGuides, ebooks, your favorite eJournals, and more …
  • Your Librarians, Michele Matucheski and Kellee Selden, will still be available to support the work you do by providing articles, and full-text access, research, and training—as usual.
  • The physical libraries at Mercy Medical Center in Oshkosh and the CSM Library in Milwaukee remain the resource libraries for ALL of Ascension Wisconsin.  The Libraries at St Joseph's and All Saints remain open for self service, though Kellee is there on a limited schedule, as posted.  Only the Library intranet website is changing. 

What to use instead?
·          Use the Ascension Wisconsin Library Services LibGuide as the Library Intranet  Home Page: 

·         




How to get there?
·      
        Direct Link :  https://ascension-wi.libguides.com/libraryservices 

          Handy Tip :  Bookmark this page for easy future reference!

After September 21, 2021: the previous paths on the legacy intranets will also lead you to the new AW Library LibGuide.



Questions or comments?  Please contact your AW Librarians:
 Michele Matucheski. and Kellee Selden

Monday, September 6, 2021

Safety of Covid Vaccines Validated in NEJM Study

This study was recently cited by Dr. Rich Fogel at a national Ascension Covid Update Meeting as to the safety and efficacy of the Covid vaccines.

The full article includes a graphic charting the (Figure 4) Absolute Excess Risk of Various Adverse Events after Vaccination or SARS-CoV-2 Infection.  This should help clarify some of the risks of getting the vaccine vs. going without it.

Safety of the BNT162b2 mRNA Covid-19 Vaccine in a Nationwide Setting

N Engl J Med
2021 Aug 25. Online ahead of print.
Noam Barda 1, Noa Dagan 1, Yatir Ben-Shlomo 1, et al.
PMID: 34432976
DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa2110475

Abstract

Background: Preapproval trials showed that messenger RNA (mRNA)-based vaccines against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) had a good safety profile, yet these trials were subject to size and patient-mix limitations. An evaluation of the safety of the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine with respect to a broad range of potential adverse events is needed.

Methods: We used data from the largest health care organization in Israel to evaluate the safety of the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine. For each potential adverse event, in a population of persons with no previous diagnosis of that event, we individually matched vaccinated persons to unvaccinated persons according to sociodemographic and clinical variables. Risk ratios and risk differences at 42 days after vaccination were derived with the use of the Kaplan-Meier estimator. To place these results in context, we performed a similar analysis involving SARS-CoV-2-infected persons matched to uninfected persons. The same adverse events were studied in the vaccination and SARS-CoV-2 infection analyses.

Results: In the vaccination analysis, the vaccinated and control groups each included a mean of 884,828 persons. Vaccination was most strongly associated with an elevated risk of myocarditis (risk ratio, 3.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.55 to 12.44; risk difference, 2.7 events per 100,000 persons; 95% CI, 1.0 to 4.6), lymphadenopathy (risk ratio, 2.43; 95% CI, 2.05 to 2.78; risk difference, 78.4 events per 100,000 persons; 95% CI, 64.1 to 89.3), appendicitis (risk ratio, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.02 to 2.01; risk difference, 5.0 events per 100,000 persons; 95% CI, 0.3 to 9.9), and herpes zoster infection (risk ratio, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.20 to 1.73; risk difference, 15.8 events per 100,000 persons; 95% CI, 8.2 to 24.2). SARS-CoV-2 infection was associated with a substantially increased risk of myocarditis (risk ratio, 18.28; 95% CI, 3.95 to 25.12; risk difference, 11.0 events per 100,000 persons; 95% CI, 5.6 to 15.8) and of additional serious adverse events, including pericarditis, arrhythmia, deep-vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, intracranial hemorrhage, and thrombocytopenia.

Conclusions: In this study in a nationwide mass vaccination setting, the BNT162b2 vaccine was not associated with an elevated risk of most of the adverse events examined. The vaccine was associated with an excess risk of myocarditis (1 to 5 events per 100,000 persons). The risk of this potentially serious adverse event and of many other serious adverse events was substantially increased after SARS-CoV-2 infection. (Funded by the Ivan and Francesca Berkowitz Family Living Laboratory Collaboration at Harvard Medical School and Clalit Research Institute.).

Sunday, September 5, 2021

Better Research Posters

Chances are you've either presented a poster at a conference, or visited poster sessions as an attendee. Sometimes it goes well and you get ideas to bring back to your institution. Sometimes no one visits your poster and you feel like it was a waste of time. 

NEJM JournalWatch wrote about this in a blog post: 

The Problem with Research Posters — and a Bold Approach to Fixing Them

  • Goal #1 - maximize insight 
  • Goal #2 - keep the good stuff
  • Goal #3 - make it easy

The examples in the last half of the video show a simple way to pare down your poster and make it more understandable and quicker to engage with. 

And now for Generation 2:


Mike Morrison, the creator of Better Posters, recently updated his video with a Generation 2 version that goes deeper into the research behind user experience for making better conference posters.  

Morrison offers 2 cardinal rules for making better posters:

  • Don't include anything on your poster that people will ignore.
  • People ignore most things.

Yes-- He includes the references and templates for the recommended formats.


For more info, check out the Posters tab of the new Writing for Publication LibGuide.


Questions or comments, contact Your Ascension Wisconsin Librarians:

Michele Matucheski  &  Kellee Selden

Saturday, September 4, 2021

Use SIFT to Quickly Sort through Misinformation on Social Media

Sift was created by Mike Caufield.  The SIFT graphic is re-used here under a Creative Commons License.  

"A group of researchers from MIT found that stories that trigger an emotional response are shared way more than straight news stories. Added to that, neuroscientists have confirmed that we are more likely to remember stories that make us angry, sad, or laugh." Source (firstdraftnews.org)

In the era of fake news, it can be difficult to tell good info from bad on social media and the web.  One option is to use SIFT, a set of 4 moves that you can apply in less than 30 seconds. 

SIFT is an acronym that can help you quickly sort through misinformation on social media

SIFT stands for: 
  • Stop.
  • Investigate the source.
  • Find better or other sources.
  • Trace back to the original source to see quotes in their original context. 

Here's a slightly different take on it:
SIFT to Find Quality Sources Online


Mike Caufield's Intro video to Sifting Through the Outbreak.  (about 4 min.)


Read more about SIFT:


Don’t Go Down the Rabbit Hole Critical thinking, as we’re taught to do it, isn’t helping in the fight against misinformation. Feb. 18, 2021


Fact Checking Websites



Questions or comments, contact Your Ascension Wisconsin Librarians:

Michele Matucheski  &  Kellee Selden

Friday, September 3, 2021

How to Protect Yourself in an Infodemic

 

The World Health Organization (WHO)  on How to Protect Yourself in an Infodemic (2 min.)


Sharing unverified information during the COVID-19 pandemic can be dangerous, unhealthy, and make our life more confusing. UNESCO and the World Health Organization are calling out this Infodemic and calling on you to be on the frontline for truth. It’s easy. Watch the video for the simple actions we can all take on how to identify false information, verify trusted sources, and help ourselves and loved ones to stay safe. WHO recommends:
1) Look for facts and evidence
2) Choose carefully
3) Be cautious
4) Be a good example
5) Spend less time online